desfistsetdeslettres:

Descartes les fesses que j’y mette mon Poincaré.

I ship it.

desfistsetdeslettres:

Descartes les fesses que j’y mette mon Poincaré.

I ship it.

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posted il y a 8 mois (® fistsetlettres)

Ethiques d’Aristote, traduction de Nicole Oresme avec glose : la Libéralité /Translation of Aristote by Nicole Oresme
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Nicole Oresme  c. 1320–5 – July 11, 1382) was a significant philosopher of the later Middle Ages. He wrote influential works on economics, mathematics, physics, astronomy, philosophy, and theology; was Bishop of Lisieux, a translator, and a counselor of King Charles V of France. 

Ethiques d’Aristote, traduction de Nicole Oresme avec glose : la Libéralité /Translation of Aristote by Nicole Oresme

@credits

Nicole Oresme  c. 1320–5 – July 11, 1382) was a significant philosopher of the later Middle Ages. He wrote influential works on economics, mathematics, physics, astronomy, philosophy, and theology; was Bishop of Lisieux, a translator, and a counselor of King Charles V of France. 

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posted il y a 2 ans

Familistère de Guise (Aisne).
@credits

Jean-Baptiste André Godin was a French industrialist, writer and political theorist, and social innovator. A manufacturer of cast-iron stoves and influenced by Charles Fourier, he developed and built an industrial and residential community within Guise called the Familistère (Social Palace). He ultimately converted it to cooperative ownership and management by workers.
From 1856-1859 Godin started the Familistère (Social Palace) in Guise. His intention was to improve housing for workers, but also “production, trade, supply, education, and recreation”, all the facets of life of a modern worker. He developed the Familistère as a self-contained community within the town, where he could encourage “social sympathy”. The full site with the foundry was about eighteen acres, on either side of the River Oise. In addition to a large factory for cast-iron manufacture, three large buildings, each four stories high, were constructed to house all the workers and their families, with each family having apartments of two or three rooms. The main building consisted of three rectangular blocks joined at the corners. Each of these blocks had a large central court covered with a glass roof under which children could play in all weather. Galleries around the couryard provided access to the apartments on each floor. There were also garden allotments for the workers. By 1872, when a correspondent from the American Harper’s Magazine visited the complex, 900 workers (including women) and their families were housed there, for a total population of about 1200.
The project contained no churches, but there were numerous churches elsewhere in Guise. At the back of the main block was a nursery, a pouponnat (or infant school) for toddlers and children up to age four, the bambinat for children 4-6. Opposite the main block was a building containing a theater for concerts and dramatic entertainments, and a primary school for children over six.
A separate block, known as the “economat”, contained various shops, refreshment and recreation rooms of various kinds, and grocery and stores for the purchase of every necessity. Produce and goods were purchased at wholesale prices and sold with little mark-up, with workers manning the shops. Goods were stored beneath the buildings, where there were storage areas for the families.
In 1880 Godin created the association documents for the Familistere, converting it as he had long intended into a co-operative society, eventually to be owned by the workers. It was called l’Association coopérative du Capital et du Travail.

Familistère de Guise (Aisne).

@credits

Jean-Baptiste André Godin was a French industrialist, writer and political theorist, and social innovator. A manufacturer of cast-iron stoves and influenced by Charles Fourier, he developed and built an industrial and residential community within Guise called the Familistère (Social Palace). He ultimately converted it to cooperative ownership and management by workers.

From 1856-1859 Godin started the Familistère (Social Palace) in Guise. His intention was to improve housing for workers, but also “production, trade, supply, education, and recreation”, all the facets of life of a modern worker. He developed the Familistère as a self-contained community within the town, where he could encourage “social sympathy”. The full site with the foundry was about eighteen acres, on either side of the River Oise. In addition to a large factory for cast-iron manufacture, three large buildings, each four stories high, were constructed to house all the workers and their families, with each family having apartments of two or three rooms. The main building consisted of three rectangular blocks joined at the corners. Each of these blocks had a large central court covered with a glass roof under which children could play in all weather. Galleries around the couryard provided access to the apartments on each floor. There were also garden allotments for the workers. By 1872, when a correspondent from the American Harper’s Magazine visited the complex, 900 workers (including women) and their families were housed there, for a total population of about 1200.

The project contained no churches, but there were numerous churches elsewhere in Guise. At the back of the main block was a nursery, a pouponnat (or infant school) for toddlers and children up to age four, the bambinat for children 4-6. Opposite the main block was a building containing a theater for concerts and dramatic entertainments, and a primary school for children over six.

A separate block, known as the “economat”, contained various shops, refreshment and recreation rooms of various kinds, and grocery and stores for the purchase of every necessity. Produce and goods were purchased at wholesale prices and sold with little mark-up, with workers manning the shops. Goods were stored beneath the buildings, where there were storage areas for the families.


In 1880 Godin created the association documents for the Familistere, converting it as he had long intended into a co-operative society, eventually to be owned by the workers. It was called l’Association coopérative du Capital et du Travail.

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posted il y a 2 ans

Raymond Aron
 @credits


Raymond-Claude-Ferdinand Aron (14 March 1905 – 17 October 1983) was a French philosopher, sociologist, journalist and political scientist.
He is known for his life-long friendship, sometimes fractious, with Jean-Paul Sartre. He is best known for his 1955 book The Opium of the Intellectuals, the title of which inverts Karl Marx’s claim that religion was the opium of the people — in contrast, Aron argued that in post-war France Marxism was the opium of intellectuals. In the book, Aron chastized French intellectuals for what he described as their harsh criticism of capitalism and democracy and their simultaneous defense of Marxist oppression, atrocities and intolerance. Critic Roger Kimball suggests that Opium is “a seminal book of the twentieth century.”
Aron also wrote extensively on a wide range of other topics, however. Citing the breadth and quality of Aron’s writings, historian James R. Garland suggests that “Though he may be little known in America, Raymond Aron arguably stood as the preeminent example of French intellectualism for much of the twentieth century.”

Raymond Aron

 @credits

Raymond-Claude-Ferdinand Aron (14 March 1905 – 17 October 1983) was a French philosopher, sociologist, journalist and political scientist.

He is known for his life-long friendship, sometimes fractious, with Jean-Paul Sartre. He is best known for his 1955 book The Opium of the Intellectuals, the title of which inverts Karl Marx’s claim that religion was the opium of the people — in contrast, Aron argued that in post-war France Marxism was the opium of intellectuals. In the book, Aron chastized French intellectuals for what he described as their harsh criticism of capitalism and democracy and their simultaneous defense of Marxist oppression, atrocities and intolerance. Critic Roger Kimball suggests that Opium is “a seminal book of the twentieth century.”

Aron also wrote extensively on a wide range of other topics, however. Citing the breadth and quality of Aron’s writings, historian James R. Garland suggests that “Though he may be little known in America, Raymond Aron arguably stood as the preeminent example of French intellectualism for much of the twentieth century.”

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posted il y a 2 ans

loquaciousconnoisseur:

Quentin de La Tour

Portraits of Voltaire

17 notes
posted il y a 2 ans (® onlyartists)

Portrait of René Descartes (1596-1650), after France Hals
@credits

René Descartes  was a French philosopher and writer who spent most of his adult life in the Dutch Republic. He has been dubbed the ‘Father of Modern Philosophy’, and much subsequent Western philosophy is a response to his writings, which are studied closely to this day. In particular, his Meditations on First Philosophy  continues to be a standard text at most university philosophy  departments. Descartes’ influence in mathematics is equally apparent;  the Cartesian coordinate system  — allowing algebraic equations to be expressed as geometric shapes, in a  2D coordinate system — was named after him. He is credited as the  father of analytical geometry, the bridge between algebra and geometry, crucial to the discovery of infinitesimal calculus and analysis. Descartes was also one of the key figures in the Scientific Revolution.
Descartes frequently sets his views apart from those of his predecessors. In the opening section of the Passions of the Soul, a treatise on the Early Modern version of what are now commonly called emotions, Descartes goes so far  as to assert that he will write on this topic “as if no one had written  on these matters before”. Many elements of his philosophy have  precedents in late Aristotelianism, the revived Stoicism of the 16th century, or in earlier philosophers like St. Augustine. In his natural philosophy, he differs from the schools on two major points: First, he rejects the analysis of corporeal substance into matter and form; second, he rejects any appeal to ends—divine or natural—in explaining natural phenomena.[4] In his theology, he insists on the absolute freedom of God’s act of creation.

Portrait of René Descartes (1596-1650), after France Hals

@credits

René Descartes  was a French philosopher and writer who spent most of his adult life in the Dutch Republic. He has been dubbed the ‘Father of Modern Philosophy’, and much subsequent Western philosophy is a response to his writings, which are studied closely to this day. In particular, his Meditations on First Philosophy continues to be a standard text at most university philosophy departments. Descartes’ influence in mathematics is equally apparent; the Cartesian coordinate system — allowing algebraic equations to be expressed as geometric shapes, in a 2D coordinate system — was named after him. He is credited as the father of analytical geometry, the bridge between algebra and geometry, crucial to the discovery of infinitesimal calculus and analysis. Descartes was also one of the key figures in the Scientific Revolution.

Descartes frequently sets his views apart from those of his predecessors. In the opening section of the Passions of the Soul, a treatise on the Early Modern version of what are now commonly called emotions, Descartes goes so far as to assert that he will write on this topic “as if no one had written on these matters before”. Many elements of his philosophy have precedents in late Aristotelianism, the revived Stoicism of the 16th century, or in earlier philosophers like St. Augustine. In his natural philosophy, he differs from the schools on two major points: First, he rejects the analysis of corporeal substance into matter and form; second, he rejects any appeal to ends—divine or natural—in explaining natural phenomena.[4] In his theology, he insists on the absolute freedom of God’s act of creation.

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posted il y a 2 ans

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