british-history:

An armed contingent of French forces attempted to invade the Isle of Wight on this day in British history, 21 July 1545. The French invasion was repelled at heavy cost to the British militia raised to defend the island. This occasion was the last time that France attempted to attack the Isle of Wight.

british-history:

An armed contingent of French forces attempted to invade the Isle of Wight on this day in British history, 21 July 1545. The French invasion was repelled at heavy cost to the British militia raised to defend the island. This occasion was the last time that France attempted to attack the Isle of Wight.

79 notes
posted il y a 1 semaine (® british-history)
demons:

French grenadiers on the Marne, c. 1917

demons:

French grenadiers on the Marne, c. 1917

133 notes
posted il y a 2 semaines (® demons)

Armor of siege, around 1650-1675
Datation : vers 1650-1675
Matériaux : Fer, laiton, cuir, velours
Techniques : Forgé, riveté
Lieu de création : France
Hauteur : 1,25 m (environ)
Largeur : 0,55 m
Poids : 13,7 Kg

During Louis XIV’s reign, sieges represented the majority of military operations. Places are methodically attacked and defended following the principles edicted by Vauban. Reaching and conquering a city is a perillous mission: creating trenches under the ennemy’s fire, destroying the remparts with the use of powerful exploding mines… Therefore numerous officers protect themselves by wearing thick iron armors.

Armor of siege, around 1650-1675

  • Datation : vers 1650-1675
  • Matériaux : Fer, laiton, cuir, velours
  • Techniques : Forgé, riveté
  • Lieu de création : France
  • Hauteur : 1,25 m (environ)
  • Largeur : 0,55 m
  • Poids : 13,7 Kg

During Louis XIV’s reign, sieges represented the majority of military operations. Places are methodically attacked and defended following the principles edicted by Vauban. Reaching and conquering a city is a perillous mission: creating trenches under the ennemy’s fire, destroying the remparts with the use of powerful exploding mines… Therefore numerous officers protect themselves by wearing thick iron armors.

58 notes
posted il y a 2 semaines
Asia-pacific - Remembering the Bengalis who fought for France in WWI
11 notes
posted il y a 1 mois

secondworldwarineurope:

The Ruins of Normandy: Rare Color Photos From France, 1944

Ruins, northwestern France, summer 1944, after D-Day.

American troops clear wreckage in Saint-Lô, Normandy, 1944.

Destroyed town in northwest France, summer 1944.

American troops in courtyard of ruined building, northwestern France, summer 1944.

Ruined tank near St. Gilles (or perhaps Hambye), France, 1944.

American troops, northwestern France, summer 1944.

Ruined building and sign in French and German, northwestern France, summer 1944.

Jeeps (including a press vehicle) in the town square, Marigny (Manche), Normandy, 1944.

Ruins of a town in northwestern France, summer 1944.

Unloading vehicles and supplies from an LST (landing ship, tank) at Normandy beachhead, summer 1944. (source)

fot: Frank Scherschel

984 notes
posted il y a 4 mois (® secondworldwarineurope-deactiva)

Le chef d’escadron Moog au milieu des hommes du 4e régiment de Spahis.
Date : 1914- 1918
Le chef d’escadron Moog au milieu des hommes du 4e régiment de Spahis.
Date : 1914- 1918
23 notes
posted il y a 5 mois

Carte postale ancienne Fleur de France, le Bleuet.@ credits

In the language of flowers, the cornflower symbolizes delicacy and timidity, and indicates that a message has a pure, innocent, or delicate intention.

The cornflower – like the poppy – continued to grow in land devastated by the thousands of shells which were launched daily by the entrenched armies of the Western Front. These flowers were often the only visible evidence of life, and the only sign of color in the mud of the trenches.
At the same time, the term “bluets” was used also to refer to the class of conscripted soldiers born in 1895 who arrived in the lead-up to the Second Battle of the Aisne, because of the horizon blue uniform worn by French soldiers after 1915.
The origin of the badge dates to 1916. Suzanne Lenhardt, head nurse in Les Invalides and widow of a Colonial Infantry captain killed in 1915, and Charlotte Malleterre, sister of Général Gustave Léon Niox and the wife of Général Gabriel Malleterre, both moved by the suffering endured by the war wounded for whom they were responsible and faced with the necessity to give them an active task, decided to organize workshops where cornflower badges were made from tissue paper. These badges were sold to the public at various times, and the revenues generated by this permitted them to give these men a small income. They gradually became a symbol of the rehabilitation of soldiers through labor.

Carte postale ancienne Fleur de France, le Bleuet.@ credits

In the language of flowers, the cornflower symbolizes delicacy and timidity, and indicates that a message has a pure, innocent, or delicate intention.

The cornflower – like the poppy – continued to grow in land devastated by the thousands of shells which were launched daily by the entrenched armies of the Western Front. These flowers were often the only visible evidence of life, and the only sign of color in the mud of the trenches.

At the same time, the term “bluets” was used also to refer to the class of conscripted soldiers born in 1895 who arrived in the lead-up to the Second Battle of the Aisne, because of the horizon blue uniform worn by French soldiers after 1915.

The origin of the badge dates to 1916. Suzanne Lenhardt, head nurse in Les Invalides and widow of a Colonial Infantry captain killed in 1915, and Charlotte Malleterre, sister of Général Gustave Léon Niox and the wife of Général Gabriel Malleterre, both moved by the suffering endured by the war wounded for whom they were responsible and faced with the necessity to give them an active task, decided to organize workshops where cornflower badges were made from tissue paper. These badges were sold to the public at various times, and the revenues generated by this permitted them to give these men a small income. They gradually became a symbol of the rehabilitation of soldiers through labor.

303 notes
posted il y a 5 mois
Centenaire de la Première Guerre mondiale: combien de «poilus» de votre département parmi les victimes? [CARTE INTERACTIVE] | Slate
7 notes
posted il y a 5 mois

Cachet du général en chef de l’armée de l’Ouest (1794). 

The Army of the West (armée de l’Ouest) was one of the French Revolutionary Armies. It was created on 1 August 1793 by merging the armée des côtes de Brest, the armée des côtes de La Rochelle, and the armée de Mayence, and was sent to fight the revolt in the Vendee.

Cachet du général en chef de l’armée de l’Ouest (1794). 

The Army of the West (armée de l’Ouest) was one of the French Revolutionary Armies. It was created on 1 August 1793 by merging the armée des côtes de Brest, the armée des côtes de La Rochelle, and the armée de Mayence, and was sent to fight the revolt in the Vendee.

42 notes
posted il y a 5 mois

Chateau-Thierry : inauguration de la borne marquant l’arrêt de la marche allemande : [photographie de presse] / Agence Meurisse - 1921
@credits

The Vauthier bornes are sculptures created by French artist Pierre Moreau-Vauthier to symbolize the limit of the battlefront as it was in July 1918. It forms a commemorative route.

Chateau-Thierry : inauguration de la borne marquant l’arrêt de la marche allemande : [photographie de presse] / Agence Meurisse - 1921

@credits

The Vauthier bornes are sculptures created by French artist Pierre Moreau-Vauthier to symbolize the limit of the battlefront as it was in July 1918. It forms a commemorative route.

11 notes
posted il y a 6 mois

Quantcast