Headtitles page in German (Trial and sentence of the Parlement of Metz, for the Jew named Raphaël Levi because of the abduction and the murder of the three year old child, on the 25th of September 1669). Page 1/11 Coll. BM Metz

The news of the case of Raphaël Levi, a Jew from Boulay, condamned by the Parlement of Metz to be burnt to death for, according to the sentence, the abduction and the burning during a ritual muder of a child, was widely spread in all Europe. Louis XIV, when instructed of the case, broke the sentence but it was too late.
(more informations there - in French)

 Headtitles page in German (Trial and sentence of the Parlement of Metz, for the Jew named Raphaël Levi because of the abduction and the murder of the three year old child, on the 25th of September 1669). Page 1/11 Coll. BM Metz

The news of the case of Raphaël Levi, a Jew from Boulay, condamned by the Parlement of Metz to be burnt to death for, according to the sentence, the abduction and the burning during a ritual muder of a child, was widely spread in all Europe. Louis XIV, when instructed of the case, broke the sentence but it was too late.

(more informations there - in French)

9 notes
posted il y a 7 mois

Cimetière juif de Thionville profané

This morning, I had to go to the funerarium with my grandmother, near the main cemetery of my city, for the first time in my life. Usually, we go to the village cemetery, where my family is buried. Anyway, in front of the funerarium, there were grass and a sign: “don’t walk on the profanated cemetery”, which made me wondered what happened for a cemetery to be wiped out.
In fact, it was the former Jewish cemetery, which has been destroyed by the Nazis when they took control of the town in 1940.

Cimetière juif de Thionville profané

This morning, I had to go to the funerarium with my grandmother, near the main cemetery of my city, for the first time in my life. Usually, we go to the village cemetery, where my family is buried. Anyway, in front of the funerarium, there were grass and a sign: “don’t walk on the profanated cemetery”, which made me wondered what happened for a cemetery to be wiped out.

In fact, it was the former Jewish cemetery, which has been destroyed by the Nazis when they took control of the town in 1940.

18 notes
posted il y a 10 mois
16thstreet:


Food and the Jews of Alsace-Loraineby David P. Rosenberg, M.P.A., Reference Services Research Coordinator, Center for Jewish History
“Circles of Justice: Law, Culture and the Jews of Metz in 18th Century France” is now on view in The David Berg Rare Book Room here at the Center. Related programming includes “Sex, Yiddish and the Law: Jewish Life in Metz in the 18th Century” this Monday, October 21 at 6:30pm.
In exploring the history of the Jews of Alsace-Lorraine, I discovered sources that revealed the importance of food-culture in this region.
The 1886 Leon Cahun work La Vie Juive has “ein Alcase” neatly penciled on the title page. This work has not only descriptions of the Sabbath meal, but also a surprising number of illustrations devoted to the subject and other holiday meals. The number of illustrations was particularly striking considering its 19th-century imprint. 
My favorites include a cheerful older woman with covered hair making matzah balls, an older man infatuated with a cake (see above), the spectacle of a matza bakery at its busiest time along and holiday scenes at the table. You can see all the illustrations by d’Alphonse Levy online. The physical book is available in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room here at the Center, and you can view its digitized version on archive.org.
I also looked at Juifs en Alsace; culture, societe, histoire. The Leo Baeck Institute at the Center holds book number 746 of 2600.  This French work published in 1977 has a sizable section devoted to “Cuisine Judeo-alsacienne.” It starts with a discussion of the importance of dietary laws and includes terms like “Cachere,” “Treife,” “Milchig” and “Fleichig.”
I had someone with more intimate knowledge of French help me understand some of the other terms. I thought it was interesting that for Yom Kippur, “Kalbsvoresse, ragout de veau,” (veal stew) and Apfelkrapfel, Pommes decoupees” (sliced apples with raisins, almonds and cinnamon) were the standard fare. For Hanukkah, “Matseknepfle” (matzah balls), “Grive” (thrush), “Gfeltes Gänsehälsel” (stuffed neck of thrush) and “Gänse Voresse”  (oven roasted thrush) were mentioned. Thrush is a game bird. I learned that these recipes may actually be referring to goose, which was an important part of the culture and economy of the people of Alsace-Lorraine.
In my next post, I will look at recipes for goose and other Alsatian specialties. In future entries, I’ll examine the economic lives of the Jews of the region. Emancipation drastically affected Jews economically, which is a topic that will be addressed in a roundtable discussion on Monday, December 9, at 6:30pm, “French and Jewish: Defining a Modern Jewish Identity in the 19th Century.”
The changes that came with emancipation affected everyone, musicians among them. A concert and lecture on Monday, November 18, at 8:00pm will celebrate Charles-Valentin Alkan and his Music, who had roots in Metz.

To learn more about our current exhibition and related programming, click here.
—
This fall, the YIVO Institute and the Center for Jewish History present an exhibition, a symposium and four public programs that explore the Jewish community in Metz, France in the 18th and 19th centuries. These programs were inspired by the Pinkas (Register) of the Metz Rabbinic Court, a rare and little-known document from the collections of the YIVO Institute Archives. 
The exhibition and program series is made possible by the generous support of The David Berg Foundation and Selz Foundation. Additional support has been provided by Emil Kleinhaus.

16thstreet:

Food and the Jews of Alsace-Loraine
by David P. Rosenberg, M.P.A., Reference Services Research Coordinator, Center for Jewish History

“Circles of Justice: Law, Culture and the Jews of Metz in 18th Century France” is now on view in The David Berg Rare Book Room here at the Center. Related programming includes Sex, Yiddish and the Law: Jewish Life in Metz in the 18th Century this Monday, October 21 at 6:30pm.

In exploring the history of the Jews of Alsace-Lorraine, I discovered sources that revealed the importance of food-culture in this region.

The 1886 Leon Cahun work La Vie Juive has “ein Alcase” neatly penciled on the title page. This work has not only descriptions of the Sabbath meal, but also a surprising number of illustrations devoted to the subject and other holiday meals. The number of illustrations was particularly striking considering its 19th-century imprint.

My favorites include a cheerful older woman with covered hair making matzah balls, an older man infatuated with a cake (see above), the spectacle of a matza bakery at its busiest time along and holiday scenes at the table. You can see all the illustrations by d’Alphonse Levy online. The physical book is available in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room here at the Center, and you can view its digitized version on archive.org.

I also looked at Juifs en Alsace; culture, societe, histoire. The Leo Baeck Institute at the Center holds book number 746 of 2600.  This French work published in 1977 has a sizable section devoted to “Cuisine Judeo-alsacienne.” It starts with a discussion of the importance of dietary laws and includes terms like “Cachere,” “Treife,” “Milchig” and “Fleichig.”

I had someone with more intimate knowledge of French help me understand some of the other terms. I thought it was interesting that for Yom Kippur, “Kalbsvoresse, ragout de veau,” (veal stew) and Apfelkrapfel, Pommes decoupees” (sliced apples with raisins, almonds and cinnamon) were the standard fare. For Hanukkah, “Matseknepfle” (matzah balls), “Grive” (thrush), “Gfeltes Gänsehälsel” (stuffed neck of thrush) and “Gänse Voresse”  (oven roasted thrush) were mentioned. Thrush is a game bird. I learned that these recipes may actually be referring to goose, which was an important part of the culture and economy of the people of Alsace-Lorraine.

In my next post, I will look at recipes for goose and other Alsatian specialties. In future entries, I’ll examine the economic lives of the Jews of the region. Emancipation drastically affected Jews economically, which is a topic that will be addressed in a roundtable discussion on Monday, December 9, at 6:30pm, “French and Jewish: Defining a Modern Jewish Identity in the 19th Century.”

The changes that came with emancipation affected everyone, musicians among them. A concert and lecture on Monday, November 18, at 8:00pm will celebrate Charles-Valentin Alkan and his Music, who had roots in Metz.

To learn more about our current exhibition and related programming, click here.

This fall, the YIVO Institute and the Center for Jewish History present an exhibition, a symposium and four public programs that explore the Jewish community in Metz, France in the 18th and 19th centuries. These programs were inspired by the Pinkas (Register) of the Metz Rabbinic Court, a rare and little-known document from the collections of the YIVO Institute Archives. 

The exhibition and program series is made possible by the generous support of The David Berg Foundation and Selz Foundation. Additional support has been provided by Emil Kleinhaus.

33 notes
posted il y a 11 mois (® 16thstreet)
fyeah-history:

A Jewish teenager living in hiding in Saint Bonnet d’Orcival, France, takes part in a music/theater performance to raise money on behalf of local farmers who were prisoners of warJacqueline Glicenstein, the Jewish teenager, is pictured standing in back with a guitar. Jacqueline, together with her friend Bernadette, staged the entire performance. Jacqueline Glicenstein is the daughter of Paul and Cyrla (Baron) Glicenstein, a Polish Jewish couple who had moved to France in the 1920s. Settling in Epinal (Loiret), Paul and Cyrla earned a living as itinerant merchants (marchands ambulants) selling women’s apparel and men’s socks. Jacqueline was born April 28, 1928 in Epinal. She had one sister, Josette (b. 1938). Jacqueline was raised in a secular home and never attended synagogue. Her parents sent her to a private girls school, the College des Jeunes Filles, where she was the only Jewish student in her class. In 1939 following the outbreak of World War II, Jacqueline’s father was mobilized into the French army. Her mother remained at home and tended the business. She worried about the safety of her children and decided to place Josette with a nanny named Marie Collin, who lived with her husband Auguste on the outskirts of Epinal. Jacqueline remained at home because she had to attend school. During the German invasion of France, Cyrla and the girls fled south to a small village near Vichy, but returned home after the French surrender in order to find Paul. It took several months before the family learned of his whereabouts in a POW camp in Germany. During this period Josette stayed with Marie Collin and Jacqueline visited there often. In 1941, Jacqueline was sent to a private boarding school in Dole (Jura) near the Swiss border, where she was enrolled as Jacqueline Glicen to conceal her Jewish identity. During this period her father was repatriated to France and was recuperating from his wounds at a hospital in Perpignan near the Spanish border. He contacted relatives in the U.S. to help them get papers to emigrate. His plan was that the family would meet in the town of Orange in the unoccupied zone in July 1942 and wait there until their papers arrived. Jacqueline returned home at the end of her school term expecting to depart immediately for unoccupied France. Upon her arrival she learned that her mother was in the hospital, where she was recovering from an operation, and that her father was on his way home for the first time in two and a half years to help her. During the night of July 13, a few hours after her father’s arrival, their home was raided by the Gestapo, and Paul and Jacqueline were taken to the police station. Cyrla was brought in from the hospital a few hours later, and she and Paul were taken away by car, leaving Jacqueline by herself. Jacqueline’s parents were sent to Drancy, and in September 1942, were deported to Auschwitz, where they both perished. After her parents were driven away Jacqueline was released into the custody of a neighbor, but a few days later was secretly picked up by Auguste Collins and taken to his home, where Josette was still living. After the Gestapo came looking for the girls at the end of August, the Collin decided to send them to friends who had a farm in the area. Subsequently, they went to live with their mother’s cousins, the Rosembergs, who lived on an estate in Bollene, near Orange, in the unoccupied zone. Some months after their arrival, Jacqueline received a letter from her father that had been written on the deportation train to Auschwitz and thrown out from the railcar near Epernay. A peasant girl had found it while tending her cows and sent it on to the Collins, where it arrived barely legible several months later. In November 1942, Jacqueline resumed her education at a boarding school in Avignon. In the spring of 1943 she returned home for a weekend to discover that the Rosemberg home had been raided and the family arrested. Jacqueline feared for the safety of Josette. Totally distraught, Jacqueline went to live with her Aunt Brigitte in Saint-Pourcain near Vichy. A short time later, she was taken by a former friend of her father’s to the Lassalas family who lived on a farm in the village of Saint-Bonnet-d’Orcival near Clermont-Ferrand. The family unit consisted of the widow La Meme, her son Batiste, his wife Jeanne, their child Ririe, and a half-brother simply called Lassalas. A month or two after moving in with the Lassalas’ Jacqueline received a letter from a friend of the Rosemberg’s maid saying that Josette was living with her in Arles. The Lassalas agreed to allow Josette to come live with them, and two days later, with new false papers in hand, Jacqueline went to fetch her. The girls remained in Saint-Bonnet until the liberation. After the war Jacqueline and Josette returned to Epinal. A year later they immigrated to the U.S., arriving in New York by plane on April 15, 1946.

[Source: Wolf, Jacqueline. “Take Care of Josette: A Memoir in Defense of Occupied France.” Franklin Watts, New York, 1981.]

fyeah-history:

A Jewish teenager living in hiding in Saint Bonnet d’Orcival, France, takes part in a music/theater performance to raise money on behalf of local farmers who were prisoners of war
Jacqueline Glicenstein, the Jewish teenager, is pictured standing in back with a guitar. Jacqueline, together with her friend Bernadette, staged the entire performance. Jacqueline Glicenstein is the daughter of Paul and Cyrla (Baron) Glicenstein, a Polish Jewish couple who had moved to France in the 1920s. Settling in Epinal (Loiret), Paul and Cyrla earned a living as itinerant merchants (marchands ambulants) selling women’s apparel and men’s socks. Jacqueline was born April 28, 1928 in Epinal. She had one sister, Josette (b. 1938). Jacqueline was raised in a secular home and never attended synagogue. Her parents sent her to a private girls school, the College des Jeunes Filles, where she was the only Jewish student in her class. In 1939 following the outbreak of World War II, Jacqueline’s father was mobilized into the French army. Her mother remained at home and tended the business. She worried about the safety of her children and decided to place Josette with a nanny named Marie Collin, who lived with her husband Auguste on the outskirts of Epinal. Jacqueline remained at home because she had to attend school. During the German invasion of France, Cyrla and the girls fled south to a small village near Vichy, but returned home after the French surrender in order to find Paul. It took several months before the family learned of his whereabouts in a POW camp in Germany. During this period Josette stayed with Marie Collin and Jacqueline visited there often. In 1941, Jacqueline was sent to a private boarding school in Dole (Jura) near the Swiss border, where she was enrolled as Jacqueline Glicen to conceal her Jewish identity. During this period her father was repatriated to France and was recuperating from his wounds at a hospital in Perpignan near the Spanish border. He contacted relatives in the U.S. to help them get papers to emigrate. His plan was that the family would meet in the town of Orange in the unoccupied zone in July 1942 and wait there until their papers arrived. Jacqueline returned home at the end of her school term expecting to depart immediately for unoccupied France. Upon her arrival she learned that her mother was in the hospital, where she was recovering from an operation, and that her father was on his way home for the first time in two and a half years to help her. During the night of July 13, a few hours after her father’s arrival, their home was raided by the Gestapo, and Paul and Jacqueline were taken to the police station. Cyrla was brought in from the hospital a few hours later, and she and Paul were taken away by car, leaving Jacqueline by herself. Jacqueline’s parents were sent to Drancy, and in September 1942, were deported to Auschwitz, where they both perished. After her parents were driven away Jacqueline was released into the custody of a neighbor, but a few days later was secretly picked up by Auguste Collins and taken to his home, where Josette was still living. After the Gestapo came looking for the girls at the end of August, the Collin decided to send them to friends who had a farm in the area. Subsequently, they went to live with their mother’s cousins, the Rosembergs, who lived on an estate in Bollene, near Orange, in the unoccupied zone. Some months after their arrival, Jacqueline received a letter from her father that had been written on the deportation train to Auschwitz and thrown out from the railcar near Epernay. A peasant girl had found it while tending her cows and sent it on to the Collins, where it arrived barely legible several months later. In November 1942, Jacqueline resumed her education at a boarding school in Avignon. In the spring of 1943 she returned home for a weekend to discover that the Rosemberg home had been raided and the family arrested. Jacqueline feared for the safety of Josette. Totally distraught, Jacqueline went to live with her Aunt Brigitte in Saint-Pourcain near Vichy. A short time later, she was taken by a former friend of her father’s to the Lassalas family who lived on a farm in the village of Saint-Bonnet-d’Orcival near Clermont-Ferrand. The family unit consisted of the widow La Meme, her son Batiste, his wife Jeanne, their child Ririe, and a half-brother simply called Lassalas. A month or two after moving in with the Lassalas’ Jacqueline received a letter from a friend of the Rosemberg’s maid saying that Josette was living with her in Arles. The Lassalas agreed to allow Josette to come live with them, and two days later, with new false papers in hand, Jacqueline went to fetch her. The girls remained in Saint-Bonnet until the liberation. After the war Jacqueline and Josette returned to Epinal. A year later they immigrated to the U.S., arriving in New York by plane on April 15, 1946.

[Source: Wolf, Jacqueline. “Take Care of Josette: A Memoir in Defense of Occupied France.” Franklin Watts, New York, 1981.]

48 notes
posted il y a 1 an (® fyeah-history)

 A miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France depicting the expulsion of Jews from France in 1182.
@credits

The First Crusade led to nearly a century of accusations (blood libel) against the Jews, many of whom were burned or attacked in France. Immediately after the coronation of Philip Augustus on 14 March 1181, the King ordered the Jews arrested on a Saturday, in all their synagogues, and despoiled of their money and their investments. In the following April 1182, he published an edict of expulsion, but according the Jews a delay of three months for the sale of their personal property. Immovable property, however, such as houses, fields, vines, barns, and wine-presses, he confiscated. The Jews attempted to win over the nobles to their side, but in vain. In July they were compelled to leave the royal domains of France (and not the whole kingdom); their synagogues were converted into churches. These successive measures were simply expedients to fill the royal coffers. The goods confiscated by the king were at once converted into cash.

 A miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France depicting the expulsion of Jews from France in 1182.

@credits

The First Crusade led to nearly a century of accusations (blood libel) against the Jews, many of whom were burned or attacked in France. Immediately after the coronation of Philip Augustus on 14 March 1181, the King ordered the Jews arrested on a Saturday, in all their synagogues, and despoiled of their money and their investments. In the following April 1182, he published an edict of expulsion, but according the Jews a delay of three months for the sale of their personal property. Immovable property, however, such as houses, fields, vines, barns, and wine-presses, he confiscated. The Jews attempted to win over the nobles to their side, but in vain. In July they were compelled to leave the royal domains of France (and not the whole kingdom); their synagogues were converted into churches. These successive measures were simply expedients to fill the royal coffers. The goods confiscated by the king were at once converted into cash.

55 notes
posted il y a 1 an
Les aventures de Rabbi Jacob
@credits

The Mad Adventures of Rabbi Jacob (FrenchLes Aventures de Rabbi Jacob) is a 1973 French-Italian comedy film directed by Gérard Oury, starring Louis de Funès and Claude Giraud.

In this riot of frantic disguises and mistaken identities, Victor Pivert, a blustering, bigoted French factory owner, finds himself taken hostage by Slimane, an Arab rebel leader. The two dress up as rabbis as they try to elude not only assasins from Slimane’s country, but also the police, who think Pivert is a murderer. Pivert ends up posing as Rabbi Jacob, a beloved figure who’s returned to France for his first visit after 30 years in the United States. Adding to the confusion are Pivert’s dentist-wife, who thinks her husband is leaving her for another woman, their daughter, who’s about to get married, and a Parisian neighborhood filled with people eager to celebrate the return of Rabbi Jacob. (summary from imbd)

41 notes
posted il y a 1 an

unhistorical:

January 13, 1898: ”J’accuse” is published.

Émile Zola’s letter denouncing the French government for its anti-Semitism was directed at the president of France, Félix Faure, and it was published on the front page of future Prime Minster Georges Clemenceau’s newspaper L’Aurore for all of France to read. By this time, Alfred Dreyfus, the Jewish French artillery officer who had been publicly stripped of his rank after being found guilty of treason, had spent three years on the penal colony on Devil’s Island. In that period of time, new evidence linking an entirely different figure to whatever acts Dreyfus had been charged with was exposed, kicking off a debate over anti-Semitism that split the country.

Zola’s letter was one important part of that debate; it began with this line:

Would you allow me, in my gratitude for the benevolent reception that you gave me one day, to draw the attention of your rightful glory and to tell you that your star, so happy until now, is threatened by the most shameful and most ineffaceable of blemishes?

Zola went on to describe what he called a “stain on [France]’s cheek” - the faulty case made against Alfred Dreyfus that led to his unjust conviction, the anti-Semitism of the French government, and the acquittal of the actual perpetrator of treason, whose guilt had been covered up. He made his arguments so strongly that the government would have to sue him for libel, which he knew full well; by being brought to trial, Zola would in turn force the government to reveal their weak case against Dreyfus and new evidence that might work in his favor. Zola was convicted of treason in February of 1898 but fled to England in order to escape jail time, confident in his own statement that “The truth is on the march, and nothing shall stop it.” The truth marched on, and in 1906, Dreyfus was completely exonerated, and he was even awarded the Légion d’honneur. As far as Zola’s involvement was concerned, Dreyfus’ triumph was a triumph for the modern intellectual and his or her new influence on society.

435 notes
posted il y a 1 an (® unhistorical)

Le traître : Dégradation d’Alfred Dreyfus, dégradation dans la Cour Morlan de l’École militaire à Paris.
@credits

In 1894, the French Army’s counter-intelligence section, led by Lt. Col. Jean Conrad Sandherr, became aware that new artillery information was being passed to the German embassy in Paris by a highly placed spy likely to be posted in the French General Staff. Suspicion quickly fell upon Captain Alfred Dreyfus, who was arrested for treason on 15 October 1894. On 5 January 1895, Dreyfus was summarily convicted in a secret court martial, publicly stripped of his army rank, and sentenced to life imprisonment in a penal colony on Devil’s Island in French Guiana.

Le traître : Dégradation d’Alfred Dreyfus, dégradation dans la Cour Morlan de l’École militaire à Paris.

@credits

In 1894, the French Army’s counter-intelligence section, led by Lt. Col. Jean Conrad Sandherr, became aware that new artillery information was being passed to the German embassy in Paris by a highly placed spy likely to be posted in the French General Staff. Suspicion quickly fell upon Captain Alfred Dreyfus, who was arrested for treason on 15 October 1894. On 5 January 1895, Dreyfus was summarily convicted in a secret court martial, publicly stripped of his army rank, and sentenced to life imprisonment in a penal colony on Devil’s Island in French Guiana.

80 notes
posted il y a 1 an


Rideau d’arche sainte, Parokhet
France, 1791
Torah ark/Aron Kodesh curtain - France, 1791
@credits

Rideau d’arche sainte, Parokhet

France, 1791

Torah ark/Aron Kodesh curtain - France, 1791

@credits

8 notes
posted il y a 1 an

Les frères Deodat et Elie, juifs, habitants de Bray-sur-Seine (“Braia”), abandonnent en 1206 au chapitre de Saint-Victor de Paris la terre et lamasure que Jean de Fontenay avait à Aubervilliers et quileur avaient été remises à titre de gage.L’abbaye de Saint-Victor, en faisant l’acquisition des biens de Jean de Fontenay, avait voulu racheter le gage . Pour donner plus de force à cette cession , la charte en latin fut scellée du sceau royal rond de cire verte sur double queue de parchemin. Au dos de l’acte figure une quittance en hébreu écrite de la main des frères.
@credits

The abbey of Saint Denis is buying Jean de Fontenay’s land and house in Aubervillers. As he had given them as a security to two Jewish brothers Deodat and Elie, the contract was signed between the abbey and the two brothers (their signature, in hebrew, is on the back of the document)
11 notes
posted il y a 1 an

Quantcast