soudakki:

raptortooth:

mybine:

lumos5001:

amazingpeetaisnotonfire:

sluttynuggets:

aphtaiwan:

johnhamishmorstan:

I don’t understand american school years what the fuck is a freshman or a sophomore why do you have these words instead of the numbers

what why would you use numbers

so IT FUCKING MAKES SENSE WHAT THE HELL IS A SOFT MOORE OR A FRESH MAN WHY ARE THE MEN FRESH

image

America makes no sense, as usual.

bless the person that actually made the chart

laughter from France

image

France what the fuck

France always had was weird with counting xD

Oh, one of the mysteries of my life was just lifted. lol I always thought that “freshman” was a pet name for the youngest generations in school… Maybe bc in Poland’s high schools the youngest were always called “cats”…

It’s not weird counting. It’s fusinioning. We count backwards, that’s true but that doesn’t explain why we have two naming systems. 

At the beginning ( after Jules Ferry’s laws of the early 1880’s) when our school system was even more elitist than nowadays, there used to be two kind of school: schools for the common people let’s say, that ended around 14 (a bit before, a bit after, depending of the time), and a school for rich people where you could learn latin or greec, enter if you had money, and that took you to university.

The two systems were separated. A wealthy child couldn’t go to the common people’s school, and if you had no money, even if you were brilliant, (that’s one of the reason French national tests at that time got better results than nowadays, because only 10% of the students, from the wealthier families, took them. Not nearly 100% of them like today), you could get extra classes in the primaire supérieur, and if you were very lucky and very brilliant go to the lycée and to university.

Anyway, the school for wealthy people was called the lycée even though it was composed of primary school, junior high, and high school. You found the unity in the name of the classes because  each one got a number. From 11th to Terminale. Primary school and junior high were nicknamed “les petites classes du lycée”.

This system doesn’t exist anymore because of the reforms voted after WW2 - one of the main in 1975 with the creation of the “collège unique” (one junior high for everyone) - created a unique organisation of scolarity for everyone. The class of the collège and the lycée (junior high and high school) kept their elitist numbers, but primary schools kept the names they had before the fusion for the small classes: cours préparatoire, cours élémentaire and cours moyen.

551 161 notes
posted il y a 2 semaines (® vexingholmes)
Marie Curie's century-old radioactive notebook still requires lead box

lostsplendor:

"Marie Curie made some of the most significant contributions to science in the 20th century. And as most people already know, she did so at a great cost to her own health. What most people probably don’t know, however, is that the radiation levels she was exposed to were so powerful that her notebooks must now be kept in lead-lined boxes." - Adam Clark Estes, Gizmodo

352 notes
posted il y a 3 semaines (® lostsplendor)
'Here lies a good Frenchman': A victim of 6 February 1934
5 notes
posted il y a 3 semaines
art-history:


Henri Cartier-BressonFrench, 1908-2004
Midnight On a New York Subway, Bound for Harlem, 1956

art-history:

Henri Cartier-Bresson
French, 1908-2004

Midnight On a New York Subway, Bound for Harlem, 1956

10 989 notes
posted il y a 2 mois (® mpdrolet)

Anna Langfus

Anna Langfus (born Anna-Regina Szternfinkiel in Lublin on January 2, 1920; died May 12, 1966 in Paris) was an award-winning Polish/French author. She was also a concentration camp survivor. She won the Prix Goncourt in 1962 for Les bagages de sable (translated as “The Lost Shore”), which concerns a concentration camp survivor.

Anna Langfus

Anna Langfus (born Anna-Regina Szternfinkiel in Lublin on January 2, 1920; died May 12, 1966 in Paris) was an award-winning Polish/French author. She was also a concentration camp survivor. She won the Prix Goncourt in 1962 for Les bagages de sable (translated as “The Lost Shore”), which concerns a concentration camp survivor.

10 notes
posted il y a 2 mois

[Personnage en tenue de camouflage [?] posant en atelier] : [photographie] / [non identifié]
Character in a military camouflage [?]

[Personnage en tenue de camouflage [?] posant en atelier] : [photographie] / [non identifié]

Character in a military camouflage [?]

8 notes
posted il y a 2 mois

fyeah-history:

ON THIS DAY: 2000 - Air France Flight 4590, a Concorde supersonic passenger jet, F-BTSC, crashes just after takeoff from Paris killing all 109 aboard and 4 on the ground
Air France Flight 4590 was a Concorde flight operated by Air France which was scheduled to fly from Charles de Gaulle International Airport near Paris, to John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. On 25 July 2000, it crashed into a hotel in Gonesse, France. All one hundred passengers and nine crew members on board the flight died. On the ground, four people were killed and one seriously injured.

The flight was chartered by German company Peter Deilmann Cruises; the passengers were on their way to board the cruise ship MS Deutschland in New York City for a 16-day cruise to Manta, Ecuador. This was the only fatal Concorde accident during its 27-year operational history. It was the beginning of the end for Concorde as an airliner; the type was retired three years later.

83 notes
posted il y a 2 mois (® fyeah-history)
demons:

A French officer standing near a cemetery with recently dug graves of soldiers killed on the frontline at Saint-Jean-sur-Tourbe on the Champagne front, eastern France December 19, 1916.

demons:

A French officer standing near a cemetery with recently dug graves of soldiers killed on the frontline at Saint-Jean-sur-Tourbe on the Champagne front, eastern France December 19, 1916.

140 notes
posted il y a 3 mois (® demons)

Coup d’État du 13 mai 1958


Musée national de la Révolution algérienne et www.memoires-algerie.org





The May 1958 crisis (or Algiers putsch or the coup of 13 May) was a political crisis in France during the turmoil of the Algerian War of Independence (1954–62) which led to the return of Charles de Gaulle to political responsibilities after a twelve-year absence. It started as a coup attempt led at Algiers on 13 May 1958 by a coalition headed by Algiers deputy and reserve airborne officer Pierre Lagaillarde, French Generals Raoul Salan, Edmond Jouhaud, Jean Gracieux, and Jacques Massu, and by Admiral Philippe Auboyneau, commander of the Mediterranean fleet. The putsch was supported by former Algerian Governor General Jacques Soustelle and his activist allies.
Carried out in the context of the Algerian War (1954–62), the putsch had as its aim to oppose the new formation of Pierre Pflimlin’s government and to impose a change of policies in favor of the right-wing partisans of French Algeria. The crisis marked the return of Charles de Gaulle to political affairs after a decade of absence, and set in motion the events which would lead to the establishment of the Fifth Republic.

Coup d’État du 13 mai 1958

Musée national de la Révolution algérienne et www.memoires-algerie.org

The May 1958 crisis (or Algiers putsch or the coup of 13 May) was a political crisis in France during the turmoil of the Algerian War of Independence (1954–62) which led to the return of Charles de Gaulle to political responsibilities after a twelve-year absence. It started as a coup attempt led at Algiers on 13 May 1958 by a coalition headed by Algiers deputy and reserve airborne officer Pierre Lagaillarde, French Generals Raoul Salan, Edmond Jouhaud, Jean Gracieux, and Jacques Massu, and by Admiral Philippe Auboyneau, commander of the Mediterranean fleet. The putsch was supported by former Algerian Governor General Jacques Soustelle and his activist allies.

Carried out in the context of the Algerian War (1954–62), the putsch had as its aim to oppose the new formation of Pierre Pflimlin’s government and to impose a change of policies in favor of the right-wing partisans of French Algeria. The crisis marked the return of Charles de Gaulle to political affairs after a decade of absence, and set in motion the events which would lead to the establishment of the Fifth Republic.

13 notes
posted il y a 3 mois

Allons-y pour Clemenceau alors (pas d’accent dans son nom au fait!). Ce sera plus une série d’anecdotes qu’une vraie biographie…

- Clemenceau a passé quatre ans aux États-Unis, où il a été journaliste et enseignant entre 1865 et 1869. Il en est revenu avec un anglais correct (plutôt rare pour l’époque!) et une femme (la pauvre d’ailleurs, il l’a laissé végéter dans la campagne pendant qu’il s’engouffrait dans la politique parisienne avant de finir par divorcer.)

- Clemenceau était maire du 18e arrondissement en 1871, là où a débuté la Commune. Il a d’ailleurs milité pour la réhabilitation des Communards exilés.

- Clemenceau s’est opposé au développement de la politique coloniale sous la 3e République car il n’adhérait pas à l’idée d’aller “civiliser” le monde. Petit extrait de son discours du 31 juillet 1885 en réponse à Jules Ferry:

«  Les races supérieures ont sur les races inférieures un droit qu’elles exercent et ce droit, par une transformation particulière, est en même temps un devoir de civilisation. Voilà, en propres termes, la thèse de M. Ferry et l’on voit le gouvernement français exerçant son droit sur les races inférieures en allant guerroyer contre elles et les convertissant de force aux bienfaits de la civilisation. Races supérieures ! Races inférieures ! C’est bientôt dit. Pour ma part, j’en rabats singulièrement depuis que j’ai vu des savants allemands démontrer scientifiquement que la France devait être vaincue dans la guerre franco-allemande, parce que le Français est d’une race inférieure à l’Allemand. Depuis ce temps, je l’avoue, j’y regarde à deux fois avant de me retourner vers un homme et vers une civilisation et de prononcer : homme ou civilisation inférieure ! Race inférieure, les Hindous ! Avec cette grande civilisation raffinée qui se perd dans la nuit des temps ! Avec cette grande religion bouddhiste qui a quitté l’Inde pour la Chine, avec cette grande efflorescence d’art dont nous voyons encore aujourd’hui les magnifiques vestiges ! Race inférieure, les Chinois ! Avec cette civilisation dont les origines sont inconnues et qui paraît avoir été poussée tout d’abord jusqu’à ses extrêmes limites. Inférieur Confucius ! […] Je ne veux pas juger au fond la thèse qui a été apportée ici et qui n’est autre chose que la proclamation de la puissance de la force sur le Droit […]»

Et en plus, la colonisation, ça détournait la France de l’Alsace-Lorraine.

- Clemenceau s’est battu plusieurs fois en duel. Notamment contre le nationaliste Paul Déroulède (oui, le type qui a tenté un coup d’État pendant les funérailles du président Faure). Bon en même temps, tout le se battait en duel à cette époque…

- Clemenceau était Dreyfusard pendant l’affaire Dreyfus. Il dirigeait notamment le journal L’Humanité où Zola a publié son fameux “J’accuse”.

- Clemenceau avait les répliques tellement assassines qu’on l’a surnommé “le tombeur de ministère”. C’est aussi un peu  la raison pour laquelle on ne l’élut pas président de la République (à l’époque, il n’était pas élu au suffrage direct…), ses anciens camarades l’ayant toujours un peu mauvaise…

- Son autre surnom c’est le Tigre. D’où les brigades du Tigre. Ou l'actuel logo de la Police Nationale.

- Clemenceau était super pote avec Monet.

- Bon vous l’aurez compris, je le trouve plutôt classe. Mais en fait, c’est un personnage assez clivant, je trouve. En fonction de vos préférences, vous retiendrez l’homme d’État, le Républicain, ses citations, le 1er flic de France ou le briseur de grève qui fait tirer sur les mineurs.

- Perso, j’aime bien retenir qu’il était plutôt beau gosse en 1868

42 notes
posted il y a 3 mois

Quantcast