whataboutbobbed:

Toulouse rugby team - 1925

whataboutbobbed:

Toulouse rugby team - 1925

618 notes
posted il y a 1 jour (® whataboutbobbed)

Tagged on the Saint-Michel Bridge in 1961: “Ici on noie les Algériens” (“Here we drown Algerians”). Dozens of bodies were later pulled from the River Seine

The Paris massacre of 1961 was a massacre in Paris on 17 October 1961, during the Algerian War (1954–62). Under orders from the head of the Parisian police, Maurice Papon, the French police attacked a forbidden demonstration of some 30,000 pro-FLN Algerians. Two months before, FLN had decided to increase the bombing in France and to resume the campaign against the pro-France Algerians and the rival Algerian nationalist organization called MNA in France. After 37 years of denial, in 1998 the French government acknowledged 40 deaths, although there are estimates of over 200.
The 17 October 1961 massacre appears to have been intentional, as has been demonstrated by historian Jean-Luc Einaudi, who won a trial against Maurice Papon in 1999 — the latter was convicted in 1998 on charges of crimes against humanity for his role under the Vichy collaborationist regime during World War II. Official documentation and eyewitnesses within the Paris police department indeed suggest that the massacre was directed by Maurice Papon. Police records show that Papon called for officers in one station to be ‘subversive’ in quelling the demonstrations, and assured them protection from prosecution if they participated. Many demonstrators died when they were violently herded by police into the River Seine, with some thrown from bridges after being beaten unconscious. Other demonstrators were killed within the courtyard of the Paris police headquarters after being arrested and delivered there in police buses. Officers who participated in the courtyard killings took the precaution of removing identification numbers from their uniforms, while senior officers ignored pleas by other policemen who were shocked when witnessing the brutality. Silence about the events within the police headquarters was further enforced by threats of reprisals from participating officers.
 

Tagged on the Saint-Michel Bridge in 1961: “Ici on noie les Algériens” (“Here we drown Algerians”). Dozens of bodies were later pulled from the River Seine

The Paris massacre of 1961 was a massacre in Paris on 17 October 1961, during the Algerian War (1954–62). Under orders from the head of the Parisian police, Maurice Papon, the French police attacked a forbidden demonstration of some 30,000 pro-FLN Algerians. Two months before, FLN had decided to increase the bombing in France and to resume the campaign against the pro-France Algerians and the rival Algerian nationalist organization called MNA in France. After 37 years of denial, in 1998 the French government acknowledged 40 deaths, although there are estimates of over 200.

The 17 October 1961 massacre appears to have been intentional, as has been demonstrated by historian Jean-Luc Einaudi, who won a trial against Maurice Papon in 1999 — the latter was convicted in 1998 on charges of crimes against humanity for his role under the Vichy collaborationist regime during World War II. Official documentation and eyewitnesses within the Paris police department indeed suggest that the massacre was directed by Maurice Papon. Police records show that Papon called for officers in one station to be ‘subversive’ in quelling the demonstrations, and assured them protection from prosecution if they participated. Many demonstrators died when they were violently herded by police into the River Seine, with some thrown from bridges after being beaten unconscious. Other demonstrators were killed within the courtyard of the Paris police headquarters after being arrested and delivered there in police buses. Officers who participated in the courtyard killings took the precaution of removing identification numbers from their uniforms, while senior officers ignored pleas by other policemen who were shocked when witnessing the brutality. Silence about the events within the police headquarters was further enforced by threats of reprisals from participating officers.

 

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posted il y a 2 jours
tenebrum:

☠☥Tu Tenebrarum☥☠ 

Probably the most famous photograph of the guillotine ever taken, it depicts the last public execution to take place in France. Taken on June 17, 1939 in Versailles, it shows Eugene Weidmann, a six-time murderer, about one second away from losing his head.

‎

tenebrum:

☠☥Tu Tenebrarum☥☠

Probably the most famous photograph of the guillotine ever taken, it depicts the last public execution to take place in France. Taken on June 17, 1939 in Versailles, it shows Eugene Weidmann, a six-time murderer, about one second away from losing his head.

531 notes
posted il y a 2 semaines (® tenebrum)

soudakki:

raptortooth:

mybine:

lumos5001:

amazingpeetaisnotonfire:

sluttynuggets:

aphtaiwan:

johnhamishmorstan:

I don’t understand american school years what the fuck is a freshman or a sophomore why do you have these words instead of the numbers

what why would you use numbers

so IT FUCKING MAKES SENSE WHAT THE HELL IS A SOFT MOORE OR A FRESH MAN WHY ARE THE MEN FRESH

image

America makes no sense, as usual.

bless the person that actually made the chart

laughter from France

image

France what the fuck

France always had was weird with counting xD

Oh, one of the mysteries of my life was just lifted. lol I always thought that “freshman” was a pet name for the youngest generations in school… Maybe bc in Poland’s high schools the youngest were always called “cats”…

It’s not weird counting. It’s fusinioning. We count backwards, that’s true but that doesn’t explain why we have two naming systems. 

At the beginning ( after Jules Ferry’s laws of the early 1880’s) when our school system was even more elitist than nowadays, there used to be two kind of school: schools for the common people let’s say, that ended around 14 (a bit before, a bit after, depending of the time), and a school for rich people where you could learn latin or greec, enter if you had money, and that took you to university.

The two systems were separated. A wealthy child couldn’t go to the common people’s school, and if you had no money, even if you were brilliant, (that’s one of the reason French national tests at that time got better results than nowadays, because only 10% of the students, from the wealthier families, took them. Not nearly 100% of them like today), you could get extra classes in the primaire supérieur, and if you were very lucky and very brilliant go to the lycée and to university.

Anyway, the school for wealthy people was called the lycée even though it was composed of primary school, junior high, and high school. You found the unity in the name of the classes because  each one got a number. From 11th to Terminale. Primary school and junior high were nicknamed “les petites classes du lycée”.

This system doesn’t exist anymore because of the reforms voted after WW2 - one of the main in 1975 with the creation of the “collège unique” (one junior high for everyone) - created a unique organisation of scolarity for everyone. The class of the collège and the lycée (junior high and high school) kept their elitist numbers, but primary schools kept the names they had before the fusion for the small classes: cours préparatoire, cours élémentaire and cours moyen.

634 495 notes
posted il y a 2 mois (® vexingholmes)
Marie Curie's century-old radioactive notebook still requires lead box

lostsplendor:

"Marie Curie made some of the most significant contributions to science in the 20th century. And as most people already know, she did so at a great cost to her own health. What most people probably don’t know, however, is that the radiation levels she was exposed to were so powerful that her notebooks must now be kept in lead-lined boxes." - Adam Clark Estes, Gizmodo

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posted il y a 2 mois (® lostsplendor)
'Here lies a good Frenchman': A victim of 6 February 1934
5 notes
posted il y a 2 mois
art-history:


Henri Cartier-BressonFrench, 1908-2004
Midnight On a New York Subway, Bound for Harlem, 1956

art-history:

Henri Cartier-Bresson
French, 1908-2004

Midnight On a New York Subway, Bound for Harlem, 1956

11 103 notes
posted il y a 3 mois (® mpdrolet)

Anna Langfus

Anna Langfus (born Anna-Regina Szternfinkiel in Lublin on January 2, 1920; died May 12, 1966 in Paris) was an award-winning Polish/French author. She was also a concentration camp survivor. She won the Prix Goncourt in 1962 for Les bagages de sable (translated as “The Lost Shore”), which concerns a concentration camp survivor.

Anna Langfus

Anna Langfus (born Anna-Regina Szternfinkiel in Lublin on January 2, 1920; died May 12, 1966 in Paris) was an award-winning Polish/French author. She was also a concentration camp survivor. She won the Prix Goncourt in 1962 for Les bagages de sable (translated as “The Lost Shore”), which concerns a concentration camp survivor.

10 notes
posted il y a 3 mois

[Personnage en tenue de camouflage [?] posant en atelier] : [photographie] / [non identifié]
Character in a military camouflage [?]

[Personnage en tenue de camouflage [?] posant en atelier] : [photographie] / [non identifié]

Character in a military camouflage [?]

8 notes
posted il y a 3 mois

fyeah-history:

ON THIS DAY: 2000 - Air France Flight 4590, a Concorde supersonic passenger jet, F-BTSC, crashes just after takeoff from Paris killing all 109 aboard and 4 on the ground
Air France Flight 4590 was a Concorde flight operated by Air France which was scheduled to fly from Charles de Gaulle International Airport near Paris, to John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. On 25 July 2000, it crashed into a hotel in Gonesse, France. All one hundred passengers and nine crew members on board the flight died. On the ground, four people were killed and one seriously injured.

The flight was chartered by German company Peter Deilmann Cruises; the passengers were on their way to board the cruise ship MS Deutschland in New York City for a 16-day cruise to Manta, Ecuador. This was the only fatal Concorde accident during its 27-year operational history. It was the beginning of the end for Concorde as an airliner; the type was retired three years later.

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posted il y a 3 mois (® fyeah-history)